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toniomonaco

L'AS Monaco dans les médias

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Je ne sais pas trop où mettre ça, mais en checkant un peu pour savoir ce qu'était le boulot de scout, je me suis tapé toutes les chroniques de mon super poto TKK sur le Guardian...

Il raconte une anecdote quand il était encore aux manettes de l'ASM, en début de saison :

" I came across a fair few of these while serving as the sporting director for Monaco last summer. With French football undergoing a dramatic financial crisis, and with Monaco being one of the few clubs able to spend money, albeit with a limited budget, my phone was red hot from sunrise to midnight. There was not an hour during the day that I did not receive half a dozen phone calls from unknown numbers as agents scrabbled for a quick buck, and some upped their game – bluffing their way past reception to my office door or turning up at the team hotel on away trips, demanding a meeting.

One agent even called the club claiming we must be interested in one of his players because our head coach, Claudio Ranieri, had smiled at his client at the end of a match a few days earlier."

En gros, ça dit que, en raison de la situation économique très difficile du Football Français, avec un Monaco étant un des seuls clubs étant capables de dépenser de l'argent (malgré un budget limité (tiens, on apprend quelque chose là, on n'a pas voulu dépenser de trop sur le mercato d'été visiblement... Ou nous étions encadré du fait qu'on soit en L2...)), il était harcelé par les agents... (logique en même temps)...

Et que donc, anecdote inutile mais sympa, un agent a prétendu que nous devions être intéressé par un de ses poulains, parce que Claudio Ranieri lui aurai sourit à la fin d'un match quelques jours auparavant...

Voilà... C'était juste pour changer un peu des sujets abordés sur le topic habituellement :)

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Monaco's free-spending ascent has French sides fearing for their future

Paris Saint-Germain are set to be joined by another mega-rich club in Ligue 1, leading to radical action by less wealthy rivals

Monacos-supporters-celebr-008.jpg

Monaco's supporters celebrate. Photograph: Francois Nascimbeni/AFP/Getty Images

If there is one thing worse than having to share a cake with a gluttonous ogre, it is having to share a cake with two gluttonous ogres. That is the predicament that French clubs are agitating to avoid as hyper-richMonaco get ready to join Paris Saint-German in Ligue 1, potentially leaving the others to squabble over crumbs.

Monaco are top of Ligue 2 and could secure promotion this weekend with a win against fourth-placed Caen, who, as it happens, are the last team to have beaten Claudio Ranieri's side, 17 matches ago.

Even if Caen repeat that feat, Monaco are still likely to do enough over the three games after that to go up – and begin looking down on everyone but PSG thanks to the largesse of their billionaire Russian owner, Dmitry Rybolovlev. The prospect of France's two automatic Champions League places being annexed by PSG and Monaco for the foreseeable future has led to other clubs taking radical action.

Rybolovlev took a 66% stake in the erstwhile principality-owned club around Christmas 2011, when Monaco, six months after being relegated from the top flight for the first time in 34 years, were bottom of Ligue 2 and in real danger of dropping to the third tier. He immediately bankrolled the recruitment of nine new players, including setting a Ligue 2 transfer record by paying €7.5m (£6.3m) for the Moroccan winger Nabil Dirar. Monaco soared up the table and eventually finished eighth.

Last summer they invested heavily again, signing internationals such as Denmark's Jakob Poulsen and Sweden's Emir Bajrami before breaking the transfer record again by splurging €11m on the River Plate midfielder Lucas Ocampos.

Monaco won their first match of this season 4-0 against Tours and have seemed certainties for promotion ever since, although their domination of the league has not been as total as their financial superiority, which is one of the reasons why Ranieri is expected to leave this summer, with Roberto Mancini and José Mourinho among the names most often cited as potential replacements.

Once their ascent to Ligue 1 has been confirmed, Monaco can start recruiting on another level, rivalling PSG and anyone else for the world's best players. Their first aim is believed to be getting back a couple of top France-based players whom they had to sell after relegation, buying back the central defender Nicolas N'Koulou from Marseille and the goalkeeper Stéphane Ruffier from Saint Etienne. After that, according to reports, they will turn their attention to Radamel Falcao, Carlos Tevez, Wayne Rooney, Edinson Cavani, and so on and so on.

You get the picture: money is no obstacle. But hostility from other French clubs is. Because in late March they united to threaten to ban Monaco unless the club agreed to move towards greater financial equality – Rybolovlev may not be prepared to put in quite as much cash as PSG's Qatari owners have already done, but he does not need to because he has an advantage that no one else enjoys: Monaco's status as a tax haven. And that is what the other clubs have set out to abolish.

Monaco has always benefited from the principality's special status. The club pays far less corporation tax than its French counterparts and although an agreement means any French player whom the club employs must pay tax in France (though they can still benefit from a 20% reduction on national insurance), foreign players get to keep all of their earnings.

By way of comparison, where PSG reportedly have to fork out in the region of €30m per year to Zlatan Ibrahimovic, Monaco could give the Swede the same take-home salary for an outlay of just €9m.

This special status has long irritated other clubs, but the power of Rybolovlev at a time when others are facing cost cuts and tax hikes has convinced them to finally do something about it. The Ligue de Football Professionnel has voted unanimously to introduce a new rule stipulating that, as of 2014, all clubs must be registered with France's fiscal authorities.

That was a declaration of war on Monaco's privileges and the club from the principality is outraged, with its vice-president, Jean-Louis Campora, complaining about rivals "holding a gun to our head … [to make us] reject our identity," adding ominously that "the owner has a plan for the club and for French football but if it's decided that Monaco are not wanted any more, then everything stops".

As positions became more entrenched, the French Football Federation has stepped in to mediate, perhaps alarmed by rumours that Monaco are planning to turn their back on Ligue 1 and apply to join Serie A instead. Those rumours have been rubbished by Campora, but they do get to the core of the pickle: how can French football welcome Rybololev's wealth without the competition being made poorer?

The FFF says an "appropriate legal framework" will be found "to safeguard the interests of French football". Compromises suggested in the media include admitting Monaco but not letting them share the television revenue, or forcing them to play a quota of homegrown players. Others argue that, even if Rybolovlev is not scared off, such contrivances are a recipe for mediocrity and that rather than try to shackle Monaco, the league should encourage them to sign as many world-class players as possible, because attendances, standards and France's Uefa coefficient will all rise as a result.

"It's true that Monaco have an advantage in the transfer market, but that can only be beneficial for French football," the Bordeaux midfielder Ludovic Obraniak told French radio station RMC. "To have two big teams, PSG and Monaco, going head to head at home and representing you in Europe will attract interest and investors. Otherwise, with the recession and the new taxes, French football will die. And if Falcao or someone signs for Monaco tomorrow, and we already have Ibrahimovic at PSG, what a joy it would be to play against such players. Not everyone gets to face such stars in their career, so I view that prospect positively rather than with jealousy."

http://www.guardian....germain-ligue-1

Edited by Spurs

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I'm sure their 17 fans will be delighted.

Je vois çà :ninja:

Ouai fin si tu prends un morceau d'un commentaire .. surtotu que dans le meme commentaire , le gar dit que Monaco est un grand club , avec un enorme centre de formation etc.. donc bon ..

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A noté que eux , contrairement aux " escrocs " de médias Français , quand ils font la comparaison avec Paris et Monaco sur Zlatan , ils donnent 9M et 30 M , pas les chiffres à base de Fantasmes à 90M ..

Edited by Spurs

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En même temps, quand on sait qu'il y a une fiscalité très arrangée juste pour les clubs de Premier League, afin de faire rayonner le championnat à l'international, je les vois mal faire des articles critiques sur la fiscalité de Monaco...

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En même temps, quand on sait qu'il y a une fiscalité très arrangée juste pour les clubs de Premier League, afin de faire rayonner le championnat à l'international, je les vois mal faire des articles critiques sur la fiscalité de Monaco...

Il y a absolument aucun rapport .. Ils font le bilan de la situation , donnent les vrais chiffres et expliquent la situation actuel . Il y a pas a critiqué qui que se soit , juste a expliquer la situation .

Edited by Spurs

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En même temps, quand on sait qu'il y a une fiscalité très arrangée juste pour les clubs de Premier League, afin de faire rayonner le championnat à l'international, je les vois mal faire des articles critiques sur la fiscalité de Monaco...

Il y a absolument aucun rapport .. Ils font le bilan de la situation , donnent les vrais chiffres et expliquent la situation actuel . Il y a pas a critiqué qui que se soit , juste a expliquer la situation .

Tu connais la mentalité britannique à propos des taxes ? De l’interventionnisme d’État ? Des "Tax Haven" qu'ils ont grâce aux Common Wealth ? De la défiscalisation des salaires des joueurs de PL ?

C'est normal que les articles de leurs pays traitant du sujet soient moins orientés, moins du style "bouh, il n'y a plus d'équité dans le sport, c'est intolérable"...

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Et alors ? c'est quoi le rapport entre Monaco et la ligue 1 avec l'Angleterre ?

C'est des professionnels , Ils sont pas là pour donné leur avis sur le sujet , ils sont là pour expliquer la situation et pas pour faussés les chiffres , c'est ça le hic dans ton histoire .. Ils font pas l'article en prenant ou en voulant prendre parti pour l'un ou pour l'autre mais simplement pour éclaircir la situation ..

Si il y avait eu 90M d'ecart comme les médias Français nous l'ont dit au début , ils l'auraient écrit .. Mais comme celà a été lancé par des médias Parisien avec des données faussées , ils l'ont pas fait . Ils ont juste données les chiffres exact actuel.

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Et alors ? c'est quoi le rapport entre Monaco et la ligue 1 avec l'Angleterre ?

C'est des professionnels , Ils sont pas là pour donné leur avis sur le sujet , ils sont là pour expliquer la situation et pas pour faussés les chiffres , c'est ça le hic dans ton histoire .. Ils font pas l'article en prenant ou en voulant prendre parti pour l'un ou pour l'autre mais simplement pour éclaircir la situation ..

Si il y avait eu 90M d'ecart comme les médias Français nous l'ont dit au début , ils l'auraient écrit .. Mais comme celà a été lancé par des médias Parisien avec des données faussées , ils l'ont pas fait . Ils ont juste données les chiffres exact actuel.

Ce n'est pas le hic dans mon histoire... Un article sur le même sujet en Allemagne par exemple, on se serai fait massacrer... Donc, que ça te plaise ou non, et je connais pas trop mal le sujet vois-tu, oui, il y a un rapport entre le fait que l'article soit anglais, et qu'il ne soit pas critique...

Pour toi, il est objectif, il énonce des faits... Tu as raison... Mais si le journaliste ne prend pas parti, c'est aussi en raison de ce que j'ai énoncé précédemment...

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Je vois pas pourquoi le Journaliste devrait obligatoirement prendre parti pour l'un ou l'autre ? Pourquoi , il serait obliger de prendre parti ?

C'est de l'information , c'est tout ..

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Je vois pas pourquoi le Journaliste devrait obligatoirement prendre parti pour l'un ou l'autre ? Pourquoi , il serait obliger de prendre parti ?

C'est de l'information , c'est tout ..

Laisse tomber. Ça vaut mieux. :)

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Monaco's free-spending ascent has French sides fearing for their future

Paris Saint-Germain are set to be joined by another mega-rich club in Ligue 1, leading to radical action by less wealthy rivals

Monacos-supporters-celebr-008.jpg

Monaco's supporters celebrate. Photograph: Francois Nascimbeni/AFP/Getty Images

If there is one thing worse than having to share a cake with a gluttonous ogre, it is having to share a cake with two gluttonous ogres. That is the predicament that French clubs are agitating to avoid as hyper-richMonaco get ready to join Paris Saint-German in Ligue 1, potentially leaving the others to squabble over crumbs.

Monaco are top of Ligue 2 and could secure promotion this weekend with a win against fourth-placed Caen, who, as it happens, are the last team to have beaten Claudio Ranieri's side, 17 matches ago.

Even if Caen repeat that feat, Monaco are still likely to do enough over the three games after that to go up – and begin looking down on everyone but PSG thanks to the largesse of their billionaire Russian owner, Dmitry Rybolovlev. The prospect of France's two automatic Champions League places being annexed by PSG and Monaco for the foreseeable future has led to other clubs taking radical action.

Rybolovlev took a 66% stake in the erstwhile principality-owned club around Christmas 2011, when Monaco, six months after being relegated from the top flight for the first time in 34 years, were bottom of Ligue 2 and in real danger of dropping to the third tier. He immediately bankrolled the recruitment of nine new players, including setting a Ligue 2 transfer record by paying €7.5m (£6.3m) for the Moroccan winger Nabil Dirar. Monaco soared up the table and eventually finished eighth.

Last summer they invested heavily again, signing internationals such as Denmark's Jakob Poulsen and Sweden's Emir Bajrami before breaking the transfer record again by splurging €11m on the River Plate midfielder Lucas Ocampos.

Monaco won their first match of this season 4-0 against Tours and have seemed certainties for promotion ever since, although their domination of the league has not been as total as their financial superiority, which is one of the reasons why Ranieri is expected to leave this summer, with Roberto Mancini and José Mourinho among the names most often cited as potential replacements.

Once their ascent to Ligue 1 has been confirmed, Monaco can start recruiting on another level, rivalling PSG and anyone else for the world's best players. Their first aim is believed to be getting back a couple of top France-based players whom they had to sell after relegation, buying back the central defender Nicolas N'Koulou from Marseille and the goalkeeper Stéphane Ruffier from Saint Etienne. After that, according to reports, they will turn their attention to Radamel Falcao, Carlos Tevez, Wayne Rooney, Edinson Cavani, and so on and so on.

You get the picture: money is no obstacle. But hostility from other French clubs is. Because in late March they united to threaten to ban Monaco unless the club agreed to move towards greater financial equality – Rybolovlev may not be prepared to put in quite as much cash as PSG's Qatari owners have already done, but he does not need to because he has an advantage that no one else enjoys: Monaco's status as a tax haven. And that is what the other clubs have set out to abolish.

Monaco has always benefited from the principality's special status. The club pays far less corporation tax than its French counterparts and although an agreement means any French player whom the club employs must pay tax in France (though they can still benefit from a 20% reduction on national insurance), foreign players get to keep all of their earnings.

By way of comparison, where PSG reportedly have to fork out in the region of €30m per year to Zlatan Ibrahimovic, Monaco could give the Swede the same take-home salary for an outlay of just €9m.

This special status has long irritated other clubs, but the power of Rybolovlev at a time when others are facing cost cuts and tax hikes has convinced them to finally do something about it. The Ligue de Football Professionnel has voted unanimously to introduce a new rule stipulating that, as of 2014, all clubs must be registered with France's fiscal authorities.

That was a declaration of war on Monaco's privileges and the club from the principality is outraged, with its vice-president, Jean-Louis Campora, complaining about rivals "holding a gun to our head … [to make us] reject our identity," adding ominously that "the owner has a plan for the club and for French football but if it's decided that Monaco are not wanted any more, then everything stops".

As positions became more entrenched, the French Football Federation has stepped in to mediate, perhaps alarmed by rumours that Monaco are planning to turn their back on Ligue 1 and apply to join Serie A instead. Those rumours have been rubbished by Campora, but they do get to the core of the pickle: how can French football welcome Rybololev's wealth without the competition being made poorer?

The FFF says an "appropriate legal framework" will be found "to safeguard the interests of French football". Compromises suggested in the media include admitting Monaco but not letting them share the television revenue, or forcing them to play a quota of homegrown players. Others argue that, even if Rybolovlev is not scared off, such contrivances are a recipe for mediocrity and that rather than try to shackle Monaco, the league should encourage them to sign as many world-class players as possible, because attendances, standards and France's Uefa coefficient will all rise as a result.

"It's true that Monaco have an advantage in the transfer market, but that can only be beneficial for French football," the Bordeaux midfielder Ludovic Obraniak told French radio station RMC. "To have two big teams, PSG and Monaco, going head to head at home and representing you in Europe will attract interest and investors. Otherwise, with the recession and the new taxes, French football will die. And if Falcao or someone signs for Monaco tomorrow, and we already have Ibrahimovic at PSG, what a joy it would be to play against such players. Not everyone gets to face such stars in their career, so I view that prospect positively rather than with jealousy."

http://www.guardian....germain-ligue-1

Je comprend rien :green:

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Nan mais Footix, l'article que Spurs a linké, il n'y aucune phrase ou mot ou expression ou aucune notion subjective dedans. Il est épuré de tout jugement et de tout sorte d’interventionnisme.

Après déduire de l'absence de jugement, un jugement... Heuuu oui... Non. Après, on s'en fout de cet article, il est juste neutre, y a pas grand chose à redire dessus. En bien comme en mal. D'ailleurs, si la presse française s'en était tenu aux FAITS du début (en recoupant leurs infos avec les dates d'accord entre états, avec le traité de Rome, bref comme ce qu'a fait ASMfoot en faisant un travail journalistique), non seulement cette presse aurait été crédible et en plus elle aurait un peu éduqué ses lecteurs de type "radio bière foot". Tout ça en toute neutralité.

(pour conclure cet article anglais est aussi un court résumé, ni plus ni moins - il manque des chose spour peu qu'on s'y intéresse mais ils s'en foutent c'est la Ligue 1 c'est pas non plus leur intérêt premier)

D'ailleurs, un pays étranger n'a pas à porter de jugement sur la politique d'un autre (que ce soit le domaine sportif ou autre)... En théorie.

Mais en tout cas là pour le coup, cet article est juste simple.

Edited by TonyoFouine

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Tu ne m’enlèveras pas de l'esprit que c'est neutre pour nous parce que c'est anglais... Et que ça ne râle pas sur les avantages fiscaux là-bas...

C'est tout ce que j'ai voulu dire... Le même article en Allemagne, on nous taillerai...

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quelqu'un a écouter RMC aujourd'hui? Un amis m'a rapporter que Triaud avai sous entendu que Rybolovlev était un mafieux quand ils lui ont demander si il voulai un investisseur Russe il aurai répondu qu'a Bordeaux ils veulent des gens bien un truc dans le genre

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D'après le compte teuteur Live Tweet asm, la phrase serait en réponse a celle de Courbis qui lui a dit "je vais t'en trouver un de Russe tu va voir"

Ce a quoi Triaud a répondu "Tu sais a bordeaux on est exigeants sur les actionnaires" avec tous les sous entendus et la jalousie qui va avec..

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